Coastal area flooding places public entities at a higher risk

Flooding is the most common and costly natural disaster in the United States causing an estimated $50 billion in economic losses each year, which is projected to surge even higher as sea levels and precipitation amounts continue to rise.*

Across the nation torrential downpours are becoming more frequent, causing flooding and closing businesses, highways, airports, and schools. Last week we watched a similar situation unfold in Houston where over 17 inches of rain fell within 24 hours. This weather event left the city largely gridlocked leaving numerous people displaced and five dead.  houston-flooding-thumb

Beyond the financial devastation and displacement of communities, this type of event can also compromise public entities such as roads, bridges and sewage systems.

The stress of water can lead to structural damage requiring more frequent maintenance, repairs and even the rebuilding of infrastructure. Highway infrastructure in coastal areas is especially at risk to more frequent and permanent flooding from rise in sea levels and storm surges.*

Scientists have found the number of days of extremely heavy precipitation is rising by 1 to 2 percent each decade in the world’s driest and wettest regions. Similar increases are projected through at least 2100.*

Unfortunately, many don’t consider their flood risk until it’s too late. There is often confusion surrounding flood coverage such as what is covered, the difference between a man-made and natural disaster, and so on.

RSG’s CivicRisk specializes in excess liability coverage for public entities. For more information about how CivicRisk can address your client’s most complex public entity risks, please visit www.civicrisk.com

Sources:
http://www.climatecentral.org/news/across-us-heaviest-downpours-on-the-rise-18989 https://weather.com/news/climate/news/global-warming-heavy-rainfall-climate-central

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